Tag Archives: the mayflower bride

Daughters of the Mayflower Series Review

12 Feb

I ran across this series while perusing the Christianbook site for more novels by Michelle Griep, and the first three were such a good deal that I decided to give them a try. Now, this series is rather unique as it is written by six different authors – and covers the stories of Americans from the Mayflower through World War 2. There are at least twelve books in total. I just found the site for the series here.

The first one is The Mayflower Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse- set in 1620. Mary Elizabeth joins her family and small community of Seperatists aboard the Mayflower in search of a better world. William Lytton is also seeking a fresh start. As a carpenter aboard the ship, he hopes to succeed in this venture. When he’s asked to look out for the interests of the Virginia Company as the community settles in exchange for a goodly sum, he agrees. But the season is late for sailing and even when they do reach land, the people are weak from the journey and building a settlement is a challenge. Will Mary Elizabeth and William survive the natives and the innumerable losses as spring comes? Will William be branded a traitor just when things seem to be turning for the better?

Next is The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’barbo – set in New Orleans, 1725. Maribel Cordova clings to the little she has left of her mother- a shawl that has been passed down through the family since they came to the New World. But she’s lost something else – her father’s treasure. And the one man who can help her find it is attorney Jean-Luc Valmont. When he accepts a position on the governor’s staff, he is certain that he’s buried his past deep enough that it will never see the light of day. But then Maribel walks into his life, and as the daughter of a notorious pirate, she could ruin everything. Will they both be able to find what they seek, and hold onto what they hold most dear?

And last but not least, is The Captured Bride by Michelle Griep- set in  Upper Fort Wilderness in Upstate New York, 1760. Mercy Lytton straddles two cultures that are united in their cause- to defeat the French. Mercy was raised among the Mohawks and has keen sight that makes her invaluable as a scout for the English military. When she is chosen for a mission with three men, she is expecting the physical danger. But the real danger is to her heart. Elias Dubois is condemned as a traitor and awaiting the gallows. At the last moment, he is offered the chance to live a little longer and help guard a shipment of gold. The gold that he stole in the first place. As he sets off with Mercy, an old ranger and a whiny soldier, Elias realizes that Mercy is far more intriguing than any woman he’s met. Will they be able to deliver the gold on time – and will they find common ground amidst the divided loyalties that split the country?

My Review: I enjoyed the first novel but felt that it was quite slow moving in the first half (or even longer) I would have liked to see more of their time in the New World than was shared. Nothing faulting the author here though, personal preference. I also felt that the characters could have jumped off the page more – while I liked both Mary Elizabeth and William, I wasn’t gripped with needing to know how their story ended. A good book but could have been even better, in my opinion. I am not sure that I’ll read it again but give it a try, it’s worth a one-time read!

As for the Pirate Bride, I had only read some short stories of hers in collections (you know, where there’s a handful of similar short stories in one book?). But I was excited about it as it was a book centered on PIRATES. And yes, I needed to capitalize that whole word to get across just how excited I was about it. The above synopsis doesn’t tell you near enough about what actually happens in this novel! I really enjoyed it and had a hard time putting it down. I’ve not read a novel quite like it before, which was so refreshing! I will definitely be looking out for more books by her. But, back to this one – Maribel is a spunky kid- and young woman. Yes, we get to see her in two different stages in her life which really brought her to life. If we had only seen her grown, we wouldn’t have understood her struggles and stubbornness and love for ships. Y’Barbo didn’t overdo it on the information on the details (rigging, masts, starboard, etc) about the ships which I appreciated. But I did revel in what she included. Danger and intrigue; family devotion and betrayal; faith being put to the test; sweet, clean, lovely romance – all are covered in this one, folks. The characters were real and jumping off the page. In other words, give this one a try!

As for The Captured Bride by Griep – I absolutely loved it! I was sucked into the story right from the beginning, and couldn’t stop thinking about it whenever I had to put it down to do things..like life. Mercy was such a great character – her skills and knowledge were believable; her weaknesses true to life and her being willing to learn and live made it so that you could identify with her. I really liked Elias as well- the intrigue behind his story was so good and while, after finishing it, I wondered how I didn’t see ‘that’ coming –the truth is that it’s written so well that I just didn’t! Griep wove so many twists and turns into the story that it’s sure to keep you intrigued, just like it did me! This one is definitely on my Favorite Reads of 2021!

So, as a summary, each book that I read, I enjoyed more than the last one. I look forward to slowly reading more of this series but I’ll probably be trying to get them through the library before buying any more, penny pincher that I am.

Kathleen Y’Barbo’s website is here.

Kimberley Woodhouse’s website is here.

Michelle Griep’s website is here.

My review of Griep’s House at The End of the Moors is here.

Have you read any of this series?

~Laura

Book Reviews- Sept 2020

13 Oct

I’m finally sitting down and getting book reviews up for you all! I’ve been reading quite a bit lately – novels and books for research, as you’ll soon see! I’ve joined an online book club called An Enchanted Book Club, where each month a classic book is chosen. September’s was Peter Pan! Let’s get to the reviews, shall we?

Sherwood by Meagan Spooner – When Marian puts on Robin’s cape to help her maid’s brother, she doesn’t intend to lead people to believe that he has returned. Because he never can- he’s died in the Holy Crusades far from England. But there’s a corrupt Sheriff of Nottingham draining the people and land of food and hope, and Guy of Gisborne wans to take Robin’s place as Lord of Locksley as well as Marian’s fiancee’. She decides that if no one else will stop them, she will. She decides to become her own hero : Robin Hood.

– Click the title to read my review! Trust me, this book is worth one extra click.

Yours for Liberty: Selections from Abigail Scott Duniway’s Suffrage Newspaper by Jean M. Ward – Duniway started a small newspaper in 1871- one of the very few of its time that was focused on the advancement of women. This book shares excerpts from its conception to when she sold it.

-Duniway was a powerful woman in a time when women were expected to mind the house and babies. While she did raise several kids, she also pushed the boundaries of normality and became the main breadwinner after her husband had an accident. She was formidable in the fight for women’s emancipation.( I got this from the library)

Abigail Scott Duniway and Susan B. Anthony in Oregon: Hesitate No Longer by Jennifer Chambers– When entrepreneur Duniway was on a business trip, she waited excitedly to meet Susan B. Anthony outside the convention. That meeting sparked a friendship that would last decades – through travel by train, carriage, horseback and boat as they shared the message that women had a right to vote. They each were vital in the parts they played to bring about the 19th ammendment.

Having read the previous book about Duniway, this was interesting to read more about her life in detail. Chambers shares an intimate view of each Duniway and Anthony as they fought tirelessly to give women a voice. They were different in many ways, and often disagreed, but their end goal was the same. Duniway became the head leader in the Pacific Northwest for the Suffrage movement. This was a good, easy read with a lot of interesting facts about the movement. Highly recommend. (I got this from the library)

The Lady and the Highwayman by Sarah M. Eden – Not only is Elizabeth Black the headmistress of a girls boarding school in Victorian London, she writes ‘silver-fork’ novels- stories for the upper-class societies. But she finds the restrictions placed on women constricting, so she’s assumed the pseudonym of Mr. King and writes penny-dreadfuls. Those stories of daring fights and dashing heroes fighting supernatural villians. Fletcher Walker is the most popular author of the penny-dreadfuls, until Mr. King comes along. Fletcher has come a long way from being a street urchin and now, as part of the Dread Penny Society, helps the fraternity to rescue as many kids from that life as he can. But, Mr. King is taking his readers- and his profits. In the search to find out who the elusive author is, Fletcher goes to Miss Black for her assistance. But neither expects the danger that is about to come their way – nor the attraction that draws them ever closer

This book, you guys. This book. Just click on the title and read my full review, okay? It’s worth it, I promise. (I got this from the library)

Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie – When Peter Pan lands in the Darling’s nursery to look for his shadow, he meets Wendy, John and Michael. With a bit of help from pixie dust, he teaches them to fly and off they go to Neverland where they meet pirates, pixies, Indians and mermaids. With plenty of adventures for them, the Darling children are enthralled with the Boy who Refuses to Grow up, and the world he lives in.

I’m quite certain I’ve read this before but so much of it seemed new to me that I can’t be certain… I’m not the only one who does that, am I? I adore the Disney version, so it was fun to see what they kept and what they changed in the story. The book is a tad darker but not so much that I’d limit the age of who could read it. Barrie’s style is quite different from what I’ve read before, I’m intrigued to read another of his. Peter Pan will probably be a yearly read for me, it was fun, sweet and full of little lessons along the way.

The Mayflower Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower #1) by Kimberley Woodhouse– in 1620, Mary Elizabeth, along with her father and brother, board the Speedwell with her community of Seperatists in the search for a new life. William Lytton boards the Mayflower not only as a carpenter but also as an agent of the Virginia Company, to keep an eye on their interests as the colony is set up in the New World. But the journey seems doomed from the start- the season is not good for sailing, food runs low, disease runs rampant and hope is failing. Will Mary Elizabeth and her people survive in order to start their new life? Will William be branded a traitor and sent home?

-I snagged the first three books in this series when it was on crazy sale on christianbook.com. This book, as stated, starts in 1620 when three ships started out for the New World. I enjoyed the story overall, but it didn’t suck me in completely. I’m not sure why though. Woodhouse did her homework on the Separatists and those that sailed with them, and I really appreciated that. I especially liked William as he was trying to do what was right, even as he searched for his own faith. I did appreciate how clean the romance was, so sweet and caring without anything unnecessary! Because of that, I feel that even younger teens would be able to read this book and enjoy it as well as learn faith and life lessons.

American Queenmaker: How Missy Meloney brought Women into Politics by Julie Des Jardins– “Marie “Missy” Mattingly Meloney was born in 1878, in an America where women couldn’t vote. Yet she recognized the power that women held as consumers and family decision-makers, and persuaded male publishers and politicians to take them seriously. Over the course of her life as a journalist, magazine editor-in-chief, and political advisor, Missy created the idea of the female demographic. After the passage of the 19th Amendment she encouraged candidates to engage with and appeal to women directly. In this role, she advised Presidents from Hoover and Coolidge to FDR. By the time she died in 1943, women were a recognized political force to be reckoned with.” – I grabbed this synopsis from Goodreads because it’s just so well written.

I got this from the library as part of my research for the novels that I’m writing. I’d never heard of Missy Meloney before but I’m so glad that, not only this book was written, but that I decided to give it a try! I expected to read only the bits that were what I was wanting info on but I found that I couldn’t put it down! I think everyone should learn about Meloney- she was a woman who was behind so much in this country. I also was inspired to try and work past/through my health ailments as she did throughout her life. This book was very well written and researched, it had so many interesting tidbits of history throughout.

Currently Reading:

Les Miserables by Victor Hugo

Rebecca by Daphne Du Marier

To Read:

Winter’s Heart( Wheel of Time #9) by Robert Jordan

The Pirate Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower #2) By Kathleeen Y’Baro

Police Procedure and Investigation- a Guide for Writers by Lee Lofland

20th Century Fashion 1900-1920 Linen and Lace by Sue Mee

Dressed for the Photographer: Ordinary Americans & Fashion, 1840-1900 by Joan Severa

(these last 3 are library books for research for my current WIP)

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